Department of Laparoscopic Surgery

harinder
Dr. Harinder Bagga

M.S

Specialist In

  1. Laparoscopic Surgery
  2. Gynae Surgeries

What is Laparoscopy?

Laparoscopy is a surgery that uses a thin, lighted tube put through a cut (incision) in the belly to look at the abdominal organs or the female pelvic organs. Laparoscopy is used to find problems such as cysts, adhesions, fibroids, and infection. Tissue samples can be taken for biopsy through the tube (laparoscope).

Why Is Laparoscopy Performed?

Laparoscopy is often used to identify and diagnose the source of abdominal or pelvic pain. It’s usually performed when other, non-invasive methods are unable to help with diagnosis.

In many cases, abdominal problems can also be diagnosed with imaging techniques such as:

  • ultrasound, which uses high-frequency sound waves to create images of the body
  • CT scan, which is a series of special X-rays that take cross-sectional images of the body
  • MRI, which uses magnets and radio waves to produce images of the body

Laparoscopy is performed when these tests don’t provide enough information or insight for a diagnosis. The procedure may also be used to take a biopsy, or sample of tissue, from a particular organ in the abdomen.

Your doctor may recommend laparoscopy to examine the following organs:

  • appendix
  • gallbladder
  • liver
  • pancreas
  • small and large bowel
  • spleen
  • stomach
  • pelvic or reproductive organs

By observing these areas with a laparoscope, your doctor can detect:

  • an abdominal mass or tumor
  • fluid in the abdominal cavity
  • liver disease
  • the effectiveness of certain treatments
  • the degree to which a particular cancer has progressed

What Are the Risks of Laparoscopy?

The most common risks associated with laparoscopy are bleeding and infection. However, these are rare occurrences.

How Do I Prepare for Laparoscopy?

You should tell your doctor about any prescription or over-the-counter medications you’re taking. Your doctor will tell you how they should be used before and after the procedure.

Your doctor may change the dose of any medications that could affect the outcome of laparoscopy. These drugs include:

  • anticoagulants, such as blood thinners
  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including aspirin or ibuprofen
  • other medications that affect blood clotting
  • herbal or dietary supplements
  • vitamin K

You should also tell your doctor if you’re pregnant or think you might be pregnant. This will reduce the risk of harm to your developing baby.

Before laparoscopy, your doctor may order blood tests, urinalysis,electrocardiogram (EKG or ECG), and chest X-ray. Your doctor might also perform certain imaging tests, including an ultrasound, CT scan, or MRI scan.

These tests can help your doctor better understand the abnormality being examined during laparoscopy. The results also give your doctor a visual guide to the inside of your abdomen. This can improve the effectiveness of laparoscopy.

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